Summer Office Hours

awesome roses 5-17-14

Summer Office Hours

Between June 1st and August 14th Client Appointments will be scheduled on Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays. (Please note: The July 4th Holiday will be on a Friday this year and it  will not affect The Bravo Counseling Group’s regular office hours.)  It is generally easier to schedule appointments during the summer, however, in order to ensure your preference of day and time, please call in advance to schedule.  To schedule an appointment,  schedule a complimentary phone call, or to ask a question, please call 407-222-6239. Please know that we offer free  phone consultations in order to do our best to make sure you and your counselor are a good fit and answer any questions you may have.  We do provide Pro-Bono services year round, however, those Pro-Bono appointments are currently full. If we are unable to assist you for some reason, we are happy to help connect you with other resources.

5 Tips for New Moms of Multiples

twin babies Google images 5 Tips for Moms with Multiples

Having a baby changes your life. Having more than one baby can lead you to feel as if your life has been turned upside down and inside out! Here are five tips for new parents with multiples:

1.) Re-think your idea of “clean”  Before having twins, I could clean my entire three bedroom two bath home in eight hours or less. I could be ready for company quickly and easily. After having twins, I felt frustrated that I could no longer have my house clean (the way I wanted it to be) in less than a day. I also had to re-think what “clean” meant to me. Did I want to run myself ragged? My twins didn’t sleep much until they were five months old. Did I want to waste a precious potential hour’s sleep by cleaning? Or ought I rest instead? (Hint: choose rest!). As long as the home is sanitary, sleep and rest are more important. When we are sleep deprived, we can feel more easily frustrated, irritated and have less patience. When we welcome our children into our lives, we want to give them the very best. Giving them well rested parents who are patient, kind and loving trumps a spotless home any day.

2.) Support

What is support? It means having family, friends, or professional assistance so you can connect with other people who love and care about you and your family. It means support so that you could arrange a run to the grocery store by yourself, (if you enjoy that),or  being able to have an appointment for yourself without having to have your multiples with you. Of course we love our children, and at the same time, we also need others to talk with and lend us a helping hand from time to time. What if you need to see your doctor?  It can be quite challenging managing your own appointment while you have your infant multiples with you (will your multiple stroller even fit in the tiny examining room?)  It’s important to have a list of folks you feel comfortable calling so that you and your spouse can have a regular date night. Some families swap babysitting with each other, i.e. I’ll watch your kids this Friday so you can go out, and you’ll watch mine on Saturday so I can go out.  A local multiples club is also a great support. In Orlando, we have The Greater Orlando Mothers of Twins and Triplets Club (GOMOTT), www.GOMOTT.org  There is a national organization for parents of multiples also called the National Organization of Mothers of Twins Club,  www.nomotc.org. If there is no multiples club is in your area, you could either start one or connect to others through internet based meetings.

3.) Date Night

After you have children, it’s easy to switch the focus from your spouse to your children. Dads especially can be prone to feeling shoved aside when children arrive. It’s important to continue to put your marriage first. Working on your marriage, regularly, is invaluable. Regular date nights are important. They don’t have to be expensive – it’s not about what you spend. It’s about taking the time to talk together and reconnect with each other. A weekly date night would be ideal, even if it’s just a long walk around your block.

4.) Let go of your “should’s”

As a Cognitive Behavioral Therapist, I spend much time with my clients examining their self-talk. We frequently tell ourselves “I should…” and then a list follows. Just as I had to re-think my personal definition of “clean,”, I also had to re-think how many things I could accomplish in a day. With multiples, I went from being able to accomplish quite a bit in a day to just a few things each day, in addition to taking care of my family. When I feel tempted to pile on more than I can possibly do, then feel bad about not getting everything accomplished, I remind myself that my children are only little for a short while. When they are teens,  I’ll have plenty of time to run my errands the way I prefer to do them. For now, I’ll focus on being present with my family, and enjoy the blessings of each day. I don’t want to waste my precious energy worrying about what I “should” do.

5.) Take good care of yourself

You work hard to teach your children their ABC’s, to eat healthy foods, to count, to use the potty on their own, and so much more. When you don’t rest, don’t eat, don’t sit down, and so on, you are teaching your children how to care for themselves (or how to not care for themselves.) When you go-go-go, remember that your children are watching you run yourself down. They are learning that this is normal and expected of them. One of the greatest gifts you can give your children is teaching them how to care for themselves, by taking care of you. Setting a positive and healthy model of someone who believes she is important enough to get the sleep she needs, important enough to take the time to consume nourishing food, important enough to  take time to get some exercise, all work together to set up a positive model of health and confidence for our children to follow.

 

You may freely distribute this blog as long as you leave the Author’s name and contact information intact.

About the Author:

Laura Peddie-Bravo, LMHC, NCC is a Licensed Mental Health Counselor and Nationally Certified Counselor practicing in Winter Park, Florida. She is the Mother of Boy/Girl Twins and “Twingle.” Laura works with a variety of issues such as Depression, Anxiety, Stress, Domestic Violence, PTSD, Personality Disorders, Eating Disorders, Autistic Spectrum Disorders, and Chronic Medical Issues. Laura provides Individual, Couples and Family Counseling. To schedule a free consultation, please call The Bravo Counseling Group at 407-222-6239.

LPB Professional Photo

 

Nathaniel’s Hope event June 7th “Make ‘m Smile” is an inspiring and helpful event

Saturday, June 7th, 2014 will be the 12th annual “Make ‘m Smile.” According to  www.NathanielsHope.org “Make ‘m Smile is an annual community festival dedicated to celebrating VIP kids (kids with all types of special needs/disabilities) and their families. We invite people from the community to stroll around the park while enjoying entertainment, food, and family activities.” It will be held at Lake Eola which is located in Downtown Orlando, FL.

Having attended this event five years in a row, I can personally attest to how much fun it is. My “VIP” asks to go back each year. He loves the special attention he receives from all the volunteers and truly feels like a “VIP” every time he attends.  We enjoy seeing our friends and fellow  members of the ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) community at Make ‘m Smile, as well as the many therapists who have worked with our child over the years. Make ‘m Smile is also very helpful to our family because we appreciate the opportunity to learn about existing and new therapies that have been developed since we first learned of our son’s challenges and the opportunity to ask questions directly to therapists and owners of business which may be able to help our child.

At Make ‘m Smile,  there’s something for everyone in the family, regardless of ability. The event is also free for VIP children and their immediate family. I’d like to let you know that Make ‘m Smile runs on volunteers, (individuals or couples/families to help with The Buddy Stroll, individuals to help with parking, checking people in, setting up, cleaning up etc.)  If you have a desire to help children with special needs and their families, there are many volunteer opportunities. For more information or to register for Make ‘m Smile, please contact Nathaniel’s Hope at http://www.nathanielshope.org/. You can register for the event online.

2014_MMS_Flyer-Eng-Color 2014_MMS_HalfFlyers_Color_Spreads_ENG Make m smile 2014

The Bravo Counseling Group, LLC and Email

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The Bravo Counseling Group, LLC and Email

The Bravo Counseling Group, LLC takes your privacy seriously. As you likely know, emails are not a secure form of communication. Emails are, however, extremely convenient. While The Bravo Counseling Group, LLC would like to make your counseling experience as convenient to you as possible, in order to protect your confidentiality, we have created some restrictions on how we send and receive information.

Regarding email: Our email address will be changing from LauraPeddieBravoLMHC@gmail.com to Laura@TheBravoCounselingGroup.com. This change will occur in order to utilize a business email account with a HIPAA business partner agreement with the email provider, which is Gmail/Google. (If you would like to read more about HIPAA, you may visit this website: http://www.hhs.gov/ocr/privacy/).

If you desire to schedule and reschedule appointments via email (or text message), you are welcome to do so. We simply require a release of information form in order to be able to provide this for you. Remember, you control your information including if and how it can be shared. Emails or texts which simply schedule appointments do not require encryption, but they can be encrypted if you would like.

If you love the convenience of email, and if you do not mind if your emails are not 100% confidential, you remain able to send private information to The Bravo Counseling Group, LLC, however, you will need to fill out a special release of information form for this. According to The Person Centered Tech, http://www.personcenteredtech.com/, clients are able to choose to disregard HIPAA if that is their choice. The Bravo Counseling Group, LLC, however, cannot disregard HIPAA (and HITECH) changes, without a release of information and documenting the client’s wishes. That means you may email your confidential information to The Bravo Counseling Group, LLC, but, The Bravo Counseling Group, LLC cannot respond in kind. The Bravo Counseling Group, LLC must use encryption when sending emails which contain confidential information.

Using encryption is fairly simply. If you use Gmail, for example, you would need to open your Gmail email account in Google Chrome. Google Chrome provides free encryption. Additionally, your counselor will have to ask you a question which only you would know the answer to. It is also recommend to make this question and answer tricky, for example: “What is your favoriate color?” and your answer may be the city you were born, i.e. “Orlando.” Before sending confidential emails back and forth, you and your counselor will work out some questions and answers that only you would know. Likewise, if you want to encrypt your confidential information before sending to your counselor, you and s/he will need to work out a question and answer so that s/he will be able to unlock your email.

In sum, The Bravo Counseling Group, LLC wishes to provide you the most convenient counseling process possible, along with doing the utmost to protect your confidentiality.

If you have any questions about The Bravo Counseling Group, LLC and email, please do not hesitate to contact us at 407-222-6239.

The Bravo Counseling Group, LLC Christmas & New Year’s Hours

new year

Greetings! May each of you enjoy a wonderful Christmas and New Year!

While I’ve spoken with many, this is a reminder that The Bravo Counseling Group, LLC will be open Monday, 12/23/13, and then closed for vacation 12/24/13 through 1/5/14. Appointments are already filling up for the second week of January, 1/6/14, and if you would like to schedule, please feel free to leave a message on the office phone: 407-222-6239 and your call will be returned on Monday, 1/6/14.

As a reminder, The Bravo Counseling Group, LLC is not a provider of crisis services. If you are in crisis, please call 911.  If you feel you are not in “crisis” but strongly desire someone to talk to, you may call The National Suicide Prevention Hotline 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year: 1-800-273-TALK (8255) Here is their website: http://www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org/

Merry Christmas!

Laura Peddie-Bravo, LMHC, NCC

Owner

Three Tips for Dealing With The Boston Tragedy

Driving hoambulenceme with my child in the back seat, I learned something terrible had happened in Boston. I choose not to tune into local new stations due to graphic content, but I did pull my car over and checked the news on my Iphone. What I read was horrifying; critical wounds, dismemberment, and death in an instant after two bombs exploded in a heavily crowded area near the end of the Boston Marathon.

What does one do in the face of such horror?

First of all, if you find yourself deeply upset by this event, do not turn on the news coverage today. You already know what happened; and right now, no one knows any more. The details will come out eventually, but be patient and stop seeking news, and, by all means, do not look at the photos. They will only upset you more.

Secondly, know that while there was great horror and tragedy, there were also great heroics. Many people rushed towards the chaos to help victims. People who were spectators became engaged, ripping off their own clothing to make tourniquets for the wounded. In the midst of unthinkable pain and agony there was also amazing love, kindness, compassion, and bravery – things which we are so thankful for in our fellow Americans.

Third, hug your loved ones. Forget the worries of the day, the bad traffic, the parking ticket, the late fee, the spilled drink, or stain on the new carpet. It all pales in light of today’s tragedy. Let’s focus on our loved ones, hold them tight, and be thankful we are together.

There are many more ways to deal with trauma, and for more information, contact your counselor, spiritual adviser, the Red Cross, NAMI, or your local physician.

Resources:

http://www.NAMI.org

The Red Cross: http://www.redcross.org/find-help/disaster-recovery/recovering-emotionally

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs: http://www.ptsd.va.gov/public/index.asp

Colorado Shootings and Trauma; Tips to Cope With Tragedy

Upon wakening today, many of us saw the horrific news that at least 12 people, and perhaps as many as 50 others were wounded while watching the latest “Batman” movie.  According to multiple news reports, the movie had only been playing for about 20 minutes, when a gas-masked gunman threw some sort of smoke grenade, and then began shooting innocent people. What can we do in the face of such horror? Here are a few tips for dealing with trauma and tragedy, once the immediate danger has cleared.

1. When in a safe place, relax: Relaxing doesn’t mean having a drink or some other mind altering substance. Relaxing means either being with people if that relaxes you, or going to a quiet place and allowing the shock and emotions to bubble up to the surface. Using a substance to “relax” will only complicate and delay dealing with the trauma.

2. Talk about it: It doesn’t matter if your loved ones have heard the story 20 times, it is important to talk about it until you have talked about it enough for you, though you may look for more than one person to share the experience with. Friends, support groups, and/or faith based groups can be some good options. Holding it in can make a person’s trauma reactions worse.

3. Express yourself: Express yourself in an appropriate manner, however you like. Maybe you’ll need to write about your experience in a blog, article, or journal. Maybe you will create art which represents your experience or your reactions to it. However you choose to express yourself, it is important, like talking about it, to allow your expressions to come out of you.

4. Exercise: Physical exercise can be immensely helpful and people may experience relief from exercise. Exercise can literally work stress hormones out from the body. Reduction in stress hormones can help a person feel more relaxed and calm. Someone may want to exercise multiple times in one day in order to keep the stress hormone at bay. (Note: Please visit your doctor first if you are not used to vigorous exercise.)

5. Handle trauma at your own pace: Everyone is different. There are people who will experience trauma and appear “fine” immediately afterwards. Others will be mildly affected. There will also be those who are tremendously impacted. It is important not to compare your response to trauma with another person. We are each unique people with different ways of responding and coping. Comparing your trauma reactions to someone else may make you feel worse.

When working with clients who have experienced trauma, I like to suggest to them to act as if they have the flu; get plenty of rest, drink plenty of liquids, and cut yourself some slack when you just are not up to doing your usual routine. We give each other grace when we are sick, and I would encourage those who are dealing with tragedy and trauma to give themselves grace. Healing will come, and it will take some time. If someone’s reaction to trauma is beyond these tips, please consider seeing a professional for assistance. There are medical doctors and counselors who are trained in how to help people suffering from intense traumatic reactions. Some additional resources are listed below.

United States Department for Veterans Affairs: http://www.ptsd.va.gov/public/pages/treatment-ptsd.asp

National Institute of Mental Health: http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/helping-children-and-adolescents-cope-with-violence-and-disasters-rescue-workers/what-is-trauma.shtml

National Alliance for Mental Illness: http://www.nami.org/

About the author: Laura Peddie-Bravo is a Licensed Mental Health Counselor and Nationally Certified Counselor for over ten years. She has worked extensively with victims of physical and sexual abuse, victims of crime, and more.  You may schedule a free 15 minute complimentary call by phoning 407-222-6239.

You can also connect with Laura via Facebook and Twitter @LPBShrink

All or portions of this article may be reprinted as long as the author’s name and contact information remain intact.

Amy Winehouse and 5 Tips To Help A Loved One Struggling With Addiction

  While it may not have been a shock, many people are saddened by the news that singer Amy Winehouse has died, seemingly as a result of a lethal combination of alcohol and drugs. Many hoped that she would be able to beat her addictions and return to singing and performing. It’s no secret that Winehouse has struggled with addictions to drugs and alcohol over the years. Her inebriated behavior led to the canceling of many performances and appearances. Her death leads us to think of our loved ones who may be struggling with addiction, and ask ourselves “How do we help them?”

If you believe a  loved one has an addiction, read these five tips which may help you in your dealings with him or her:

  1. 1. Support: It’s important to be supportive of the person. Love the person, not the behavior. If your loved one feels judged, s/he may not turn to you for guidance about the help needed.

2. Know local resources: Become familiar with your local resources. For example, learn where and which local hospital deals well with addictions, and other community resources like detox programs and counseling services. If you know about these ahead of time, when your loved one is ready, you’ll be able to help guide him or her to a good and reputable resource.

3. Patience: It’s difficult to watch someone you love make bad choices over and over again. They may be damaging their health, finances, relationships and reputation, and they don’t see how bad it is or don’t care. As long as they and you are physically safe, you may have to sit by, watching the repetition of negative choices until he or she is ready to make a change. We cannot force someone to want to change, and that is where the need for patience comes in.

4. Boundaries: Having good boundaries with the addict is very important. While we cannot force someone to choose sobriety or to get help, we also do not have to contribute to that person’s poor choices. For example, if your loved one is an alcoholic, don’t go out to a bar with him.  That’s called “enabling” and isn’t helpful.

5. Involuntary Treatment: If your loved one loses the ability to care for him or her self, it is possible to involuntarily commit him or her to treatment. In Florida, there are two state laws which may be helpful to know about: The Baker Act and The Marchman Act. The Baker Act allows a person to be involuntarily sent (involuntary civil commitment) to inpatient treatment if that person cannot take care of him or herself, or is a danger to himself or someone else. The Marchman Act is specifically for substance abusers. You can click here to learn more about The Marchman Act: http://www.marchmanacthelp.com/

Watching a loved one struggle with addiction can be draining and stressful. These tips are very general. Your  loved one may be your spouse, and his or her choices directly impact you and possibly your children. Your loved one may be your best friend. Your loved one may be a parent. There are many services available if you would like more information and ask questions. Some professional Counselors offer complimentary phone calls where you can learn about that counselor and if that counselor’s services would be right for you or your loved one. And lastly, don’t forget to take extra good care of yourself while dealing with a loved one struggling with addiction. It is easier to show love, support and patience when you are well rested.

Additional resources:

    • Alcoholics Anonymous/Narcotics Anonymous www.aa.org

About the Author:

Laura Peddie-Bravo, LMHC, NCC is a licensed and nationally certified counselor who has worked with substance abuse issues since 1997. Laura also works with children, adolescents and adults who deal with issues such as anxiety, depression, trauma, eating disorders, and more. If you would like to schedule a free 15 minute phone call with Laura, please call 407-248-0030.

The End of the Space Shuttle Program – Five Tips To Cope With Grief

Many of us are saddened that today, July 21st, 2011, marks the end of the NASA Space Shuttle program. Atlantis landed safely this morning, and this particular shuttle will remain in Florida.  People’s lives are significantly affected by the end of the shuttle program. The Orlando Sentinel, (www.Orlandosentinel.com), estimated that approximately 9,000  people who worked with the space shuttle will be losing their jobs. Combined with the grief of the loss of the shuttle program, and faced with a new career move, the stress and sadness could be overwhelming. Not only the employees are affected, but the surrounding communities will lose income and may be forced to close. People in the state of Florida, and beyond, are sad this program is over. Many of us who live in Florida may have taken for granted seeing the shuttle launches from Kennedy Space Center and deeply regret never going to see one live.

The following is a list of symptoms people typically experience when faced with significant loss or intense stress. This list is not exhaustive, and if your symptom is distressing and is not listed, please seek additional suggestions:

  • sadness
  • irritability or anger
  • easily distracted or unable to concentrate
  • insomnia
  • isolating
  • feeling overwhelmed
  • suicidal thoughts

If you or a loved one is currently experiencing one or more of those symptoms, here are some tips to cope:

  • Acknowledge how you feel; ignoring or stuffing emotions may make you feel worse
  • Talk about how you feel with trusted relative or friend
  • Take extra good care of yourself, i.e. three nutritious meals per day, set aside time for sleep, exercise
  • Do your best to focus on the positive
  • Make an effort to incorporate humor into your life
  • Seek professional counsel for suicidal thoughts

If you or a loved one is experiencing suicidal thoughts, even passive ones, please seek assistance from a professional. You may turn to your primary care physician, a Mental Health Counselor, psychiatrist, or support group. You can find providers on your insurance panel by calling your insurance company. If you do no have insurance and cannot afford professional services, there are many resources available to you through charitable organizations. If you need help with additional resources, please do not hesitate to phone a professional counselor or social worker for potential referrals.

For more information about the future of our country’s space program, there’s the Kennedy Space Center and NASA. If you can’t visit The Kennedy Space Center, http://www.kennedyspacecenter.com/, you may want to check out the NASA website, www.NASA.gov and read “What’s Next for NASA?” While we are sad about the ending of the Space Shuttle Era, there are exciting plans already made and being made to continue our exploration of space.

About the Author:

Laura Peddie-Bravo, LMHC, NCC is a licensed and nationally certified counselor. Laura grew up in Orlando, FL, and works with children, adolescents and adults for a variety of mental health issues including grief, anxiety and depression. Laura operates from an overall Wellness perspective, and practices an eclectic style of counseling with a focus on Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, (CBT). Laura believes positive change is possible in all who seek it, and she enjoys the privilege to work with all who walk through her door.

Laura Peddie-Bravo, LMHC, NCC

As a Licensed Mental Health Counselor since 2001, I have had the privilege of working with people with such issues as anxiety, post traumatic stress disorder, panic, OCD, phobias, depression, domestic violence, sexual abuse, rape, eating disorders, self-injury, chronic medical issues, personality disorders, Asperger’s, ADHD, parents of specially-abled children, pre-marital and couples counseling, and substance abuse. I work with children age five and older, adolescents, college students and older adults through age 65. While in graduate school for Counseling at the University of Central Florida,  I worked in the Wellness Center on campus. I became interested in the concept of “Wellness,” and it influences my counseling approach today. I am eclectic, focusing on the specific needs of each individual. I have much training in Cognitive Behavioral Approaches (CBT), which I find extremely effective with anxiety, depression and trauma.  I am also the parent of an Autistic child, and understand the special issues parents and caregivers face with special needs children. I have recently launched The Bravo Counseling Group, LLC, and can be reached at 407-222-6239.